National Science and Technology Week Sets Guinness World Record

OTTAWA, January 28, 2013 – National Science and Technology Week (NSTW) 2012 saw a lot of science being done across Canada. A record amount of science, as it turns out.

Guinness World Records has confirmed that Canada has set the world record for the largest practical science lesson at multiple venues. On October 12, 2012, at 1:00 p.m. EST, two experiments demonstrating the Bernoulli principle were performed simultaneously at 88 different locations such as classrooms, science centres and museums across Canada. The experiments involved a total of 13,701 participants.

“Congratulations to all of the participants and organizers for setting this new world record,” said the Honourable Joe Oliver, Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources. “Making science interesting for people of all ages – especially young Canadians – is key to fostering innovative thinking and creating Canada’s future science leaders.”

“Canada’s enthusiasm for science and learning is being recognized on a world scale and Natural Resources Canada is proud to have played an important role in this remarkable achievement,” said Geoff Munro, Chief Scientist, Natural Resources Canada. ”Every opportunity to promote the value and excitement of science is a worthwhile endeavour and should be celebrated.”

“We are extremely proud that public participation in National Science and Technology Week 2012 was so high as to set a new Guinness World Record,” said Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation (CSTMC) CEO Denise Amyot. “All National Science and Technology Week partner organisations, as well as the various schools and venues who took part in the experiments, deserve well-earned congratulations for their tireless efforts to awaken Canadians of all ages to the wonders of science. Gathering close to 14,000 Canadians doing science at the same time across the country is a worthy challenge, but it illustrates how much Canadians are fascinated by science, and that is wonderful news.”

The Guinness World Record-setting practical science lesson was coordinated across Canada by Science.gc.ca, the Government of Canada’s official science portal, and one of numerous partners of NSTW, for which the CSTMC is the national coordinator. The CSTMC hosted a group participating in the record-setting science lesson at the Canada Science and Technology Museum (CSTM), and Natural Resources Canada also hosted a participating group as well.

NSTW raises awareness about the importance of science and technology in today’s world, celebrating Canada’s historic and ongoing role as a leader in innovation.

To find out more about the NSTW record attempt, visit : http://www.science.gc.ca/newrecord

To find out more about the Guinness world Records certification, visit :
http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/world-records/2000/largest-practical-science-lesson-%28multiple-venues%29

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INFORMATION:
Olivier Bouffard
Media relations
Canada Science and Technology Museums Corporation
613-949-5732
obouffard@technomuses.ca

David Provencher
Press Secretary
Office of Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources
613-996-2007

National Science and Technology Week Sets Guinness World Record

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Bergmann Medal

The Martin Bergmann Medal for Excellence in Arctic Leadership and Science

- Established by the Royal Canadian Geographic Society in 2012, the medal recognizes achievement for “excellence in Arctic leadership and science”. It celebrates “Marty” Bergmann, a public servant with an outstanding talent for networking that led him to connect scientists with resources and technology, to inspire business leaders, explorers and innovators towards new goals and to consider and attempt to meet the challenges inherent in opening up the Arctic, whether these were related to logistics, safety, resources, people, knowledge or will.

Bergmann Medal

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Science Funfest

Location: Booth Street Complex, Ottawa (Corner of Booth and Carling)
Date: Sunday, October 14, 2012 – 11:00 am to 4:00 pm
Target Audience: youth/families

Science Funfest is an open house event that takes place at Natural Resources Canada’s Booth Street Complex, at the corner of Carling Avenue and Booth Street in Ottawa. It’s a wonderful opportunity for children and anyone interested in science to engage in presentations and gain hands on science experience by participating in activities that will showcase the importance of science in a fun and interactive way. Last year’s event featured approximately 70 interactive exhibits on subjects ranging from ‘Slime’ to ‘Canada’s Forest Insects’.

You can: Bring your rocks and fossils for identification; go chocolate chip cookie mining; explore the secrets of the wind tunnel; see exotic insects; or have fun with DNA.  There is also face painting, balloons and much, much more!

 

Science Funfest

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Clean Energy-Powered Mining Vehicles

A green mining vehicle roadmap will enable the mining industry to lower emissions and more easily integrate clean energy sources.

Approximately 95% of underground metal mine production uses loaders capable of moving up to 10 tonnes of ore over several hundred metres. These vehicles sometimes descend up to 2,500 metres below the ground and can climb inclines of up to 11.5 degrees.

What makes these vehicles so powerful is their diesel engine. However, burning this fuel produces considerable emissions of carbon particulates and noxious gases (carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide and sulfur dioxide). Diluting those emissions using ventilation can account for as much as 40% of the electricity costs of underground mining operations.

Clean Energy-Powered Mining Vehicles

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Heat Recovery and Burner Technologies

Participants at the Advanced Integrated Energy Efficiency Solutions Energy 2011 workshop benefited from presentations on the latest technologies under development for waste heat recovery and furnace optimization. Representatives from CanmetENERGY (Ottawa and Varennes Research Centres) and Cameron Veitch of ConDex Systems, discussed the potential energy savings that can be gained from implementation of advanced technologies.

“Energy recovery burner technologies for industrial furnaces, currently under development at CanmetENERGY, promise significant potential in energy savings and emission reductions,” explained research scientist Peter Gogolek. Case studies found that integrally recuperative burners – the simplest burner technology – can save companies about 40% in energy costs due to recuperation and dilution loss capture. Significant fuel savings can also be gained by retrofitting radiant tubes with a self-recuperative burner.

Heat Recovery and Burner Technologies

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Contributing to Satellite Earth Observation

High above the Earth’s atmosphere satellites are orbiting, continuously recording data gathered from electromagnetic energy radiating off the earth’s surface. Data collected from optical and microwave wavelengths allow scientists to track changes to the earth’s surface.

Since 1971, Natural Resources Canada’s (NRCan’s) Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) has been contributing to the development of observation technology and its applications, providing information for environmental monitoring, community planning and emergency response.

Recognizing its long history of achievements, the U.S. Department of the Interior and NASA recently honoured CCRS with the 2011 William T. Pecora Award.

Contributing to Satellite Earth Observation

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Enhanced Global Reporting on Forest Sustainability

Canada brings international forest organizations together to agree on new ways to collaborate on and improve forest sustainability reporting.

It’s been 20 years since the United Nations Conference on the Environment and Development (UNCED). Known as the “Earth Summit”, this conference led to a number of significant policy documents, including The Statement of Forest Principles. As a result of these principles, organizations that help monitor forest health have made significant improvements tracking conditions and trends in the sustainability of their forests.

The Montreal Process (MP) group, Forest Europe (FE) and the International Tropical Timber Organization (ITTO) are the most advanced organizations that monitor and report on indicators of forest sustainability. Together, these entities represent over 100 nations containing virtually all of the world’s forests. However, they each use somewhat different measures of sustainability.

Enhanced Global Reporting on Forest Sustainability

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A Lighter, Stronger Building Material

Cross Laminated Timber is a well-established construction product in Europe. With the help of Natural Resources Canada, it is poised to make the jump to North America.

A market-ready forest product is looking to reduce the time and cost of construction for North American builders. Cross-Laminated Timber, or CLT, has been popular in European construction for decades because of its structural properties and cost savings for builders, as well as characteristics that make it appealing to consumers.

CLT is made of layers of timber glued together using hydraulic or vacuum presses. It is strong enough to support a multi-story structure, but is considerably lighter than materials such as concrete.

A Lighter, Stronger Building Material

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Science @ NRCan

New NRCan Website Shines the Spotlight on World-Class NRCan Science.

Science @ NRCan tells the story of our scientists and their work through articles and videos. You’ll learn how nanocrystalline cellulose, which is extracted from wood fiber and is stronger than steel, could be used to manufacture lightweight components for automobiles and airplanes. You’ll also learn how our scientists and their counterparts in Japan and the United States are using data from a new seafloor seismic network to better understand earthquakes and their hazards.

Along with articles and videos, visitors to the site will meet our scientists, learning more about their fields of expertise with links to their published work. As well, Frank Szadkowski will provide the Expert View, a series of video vignettes that offers energy efficiency tips for homeowners

Science @ NRCan

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Forest Ecosystems: Keeping tabs on forest carbon

Pacific Forestry Centre: Carbon Accounting

 

As major exchangers of carbon dioxide, Canada’s forests play a role in the amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The Canadian Forest Service’s Carbon Accounting Team, led by Pacific Forestry Centre (PFC) research scientist Dr. Werner Kurz, analyzes data on forest carbon stocks to give decision-makers a coherent picture of what it means for the environment. In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, of which Dr. Kurz is a member, jointly won the Nobel Peace Prize with Al Gore. PFC is the headquarters of Canada’s National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting System. To learn more about forest carbon, visit carbon.cfs.nrcan.gc.ca.

 

Gary Zhang, Dr. Werner Kurz, Michael Magnan, Scott Morken and Max Fellows

From left to right: Programmer Gary Zhang, research scientist Dr. Werner Kurz and programmers Michael Magnan, Scott Morken and Max Fellows of the Carbon Accounting Team at PFC

 

National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting System: A system to estimate forest carbon stocks, changes in carbon stocks, and emissions of non-CO2 greenhouse gases inCanada’s managed forests

 

Alternative Format: PDF document (760 kb)

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